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Roman Catholics often like touching and even kissing pictures and statues when praying. This does not mean that they think the representation is anything more than a representation: people often kiss photographs of people they love, with the same symbolic intent.- Margaret Visser in ‘The Geometry of Love’

Roman Catholics often like touching and even kissing pictures and statues when praying. This does not mean that they think the representation is anything more than a representation: people often kiss photographs of people they love, with the same symbolic intent.

- Margaret Visser in ‘The Geometry of Love’

(Source: guadalupejourney.blogspot.com)

Invocation

An interesting segment of an interview about the Rite of Exorcism with Pedro Barrajon, a Catholic priest who has performed many exorcisms:

At the end, the priest says to the demon, “Go away! Disappear!” The demon usually answers, “No, I don’t want to.” It rebels and revolts. Sometimes it says “You have no power over me. You are nothing to me.” But after a while, its resistance weakens. This usually happens after the invocation of the Holy Mother, she’s very important for that. No demon ever dares to insult her during an exorcism. Never.

Does he have more respect for Mary than for God himself?

Apparently. Otherwise no holds are barred, and everyone is insulted: the priests, everyone present, the bishops, the Pope, even Jesus Christ. But never the Virgin Mary. It’s an enigma.

Full interview

Indian Catholics hold up a child to receive a blessing at the shrine of  Our Lady of Health at the annual feast of Mary’s birth in Hyderabad in  India on 8 September 2010. The feast of Mary’s nativity is a big day for Indian Catholics, as it is  celebrated as a harvest festival and at many shrines newborns receive  blessings.Just like India’s large Hindu population celebrates the  births of their many gods, Indian Catholics honour the day the Mother of  their God was born.

Indian Catholics hold up a child to receive a blessing at the shrine of Our Lady of Health at the annual feast of Mary’s birth in Hyderabad in India on 8 September 2010.

The feast of Mary’s nativity is a big day for Indian Catholics, as it is celebrated as a harvest festival and at many shrines newborns receive blessings.

Just like India’s large Hindu population celebrates the births of their many gods, Indian Catholics honour the day the Mother of their God was born.

Welcome

Welcome to All about Mary, a new page about Mary, the Mother of Jesus.

I am a young Catholic with a great devotion for Mary. I often find it astounding how much she means to people and how much they love her. And that includes non-religious people and those of other faiths.

On this page I want to celebrate the Virgin Mary’s past and present significance by sharing with you images, stories, devotions, traditions and prayers relating to this great woman, who all generations were to call blessed.

Ave Maria! Hail Mary!